Thursday, June 17, 2010

In Plain Sight**** Gets Adoption Reunion Right

So after watching the documentary Google Baby on HBO2 and brushing my teeth to get the bad taste out of my mouth about how these babies-to-order are being put together like clam chowder and gestated by poor Indian women, I saw that one of my favorite crime dramas, In Plain Sight, is on. The show is not so much about solving a crime, but dealing with the lives of the people who will go into the witness protection program after they testify against the bad guys.

Whaddaya know? The episode, The Born Identity (get it?), is about a man who is adopted and...before he goes into the witness protection somewhere he wonders if these people running the program (Mary and Marshall, the leads), can find his birth mother. He'd been living in the basement of the public library, and we already know he left his other family at 15 and moved to Seattle and lived off the grid since. He's a well-read genius with an IQ of 142 who discovers a bomb in a garbage can and can identity the two men/terrorists who left it. He's been looking for his (first/birth) mother for oh...ever since he left his adoptive home...some twenty years ago. Said he didn't fit in. 

Well, the show got it RIGHT; the male lead, Marshall Mann, is knowledgeable about Primal Wound theory and says they need to find his mother for the guy before he disappears into the witness-protection anonymity; Mary Shannon, whose father walked out on the family and she does not know his whereabouts is cynical and against it; but they get someone to check the record for the guy and  Presto! locate his first mother. Trouble is, she's dying. All the dialogue was spot on, and they locate his mother in a hospice in California. They race there but she's already gone, and the after gathering is taking place.

The son speaks to her last husband (she'd had four, but spent the last 12 years with this one) without saying who he is. Then Mary notices a picture of the dead woman and the husband at a very young age and says, Who is this?

Husband: That's me--we were together when we were seventeen.

Mary Shannon: What happened to the son she had?

Husband: How did you know? Etc. There was never a day gone by that she did not think of our son. Our parents went crazy and there was no way we could have kept him. We drifted apart after that....

So by now I'm frigging weeping as father and son reconnect.

At the end, the man in the witness protection program will be transferred to the same city where his father is, and the last scene is of them going off on a camping trip. Blown away, I was. A really warm ending to the horror of Google Baby. Sometimes the media gets it right. Yeah, I know reunions are hard, but some of them do work out as we'd like all of them too.

In Plain Sight is one of the best dramas on cable, 10 p.m. EST, 9 CST Wednesday evenings. I think there is only one left in the current season--reruns over the summer? You can watch full episodes here, but as of this morning, The Born Identity from last night was not up. It should be #311.--lorraine
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I've been under the weather lately, my eyes have been killing me from too much time at the computer, trying to keep the blog fresh and work on my book. Our house is being reshingled, we are looking for new deck furniture as yard sales are not coughing it up (so we are looking on line), the episode of my once-close friend, Yvonne, appears not to be over...now she's in the hospital and I got a call last night from a friend who apparently knew nothing of our current contretemps and how Yvonne wants to get together and celebrate my birthday. Life is strange as the Moody Blues sang. It was The Moody Blues, right? And yes, I promise everyone the ending to the story of my missing granddaughter is coming soon.

4 comments :

  1. Carolina WhitefreezeJune 17, 2010 at 11:22 AM

    Wow. Just finished watching the show, and it got me. "In Plain Sight" is one of my favorite shows anyway, and this was a very interesting episode for someone who, like me, is adopted. I think they hit it pretty well from my standpoint. I felt the same as the "witness," the adoptee who had a tough time with life after leaving his adoptive family and wondering where he really came from. He wasn't angry he was relinquished, and neither was I (or at least I like to believe I'm not, although there was an incident once...a story for another time). He was excited to hear about physical resemblances, something that seems so minor to people not affected by adoption but is so important to those of us who were. I could go on, but it was a good show and somebody either has some experience or did his or her homework. A little too pat, especially at the ending, but what can you do when you only have an hour (only 40+ minutes after commercials)? The show is on the USA Network and will be rerun several times over the next few days.

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  2. But damn, Carolina, I really wanted that pat [happy] ending. Sometimes you gotta have the fairy tale and though they seem not to come to firstmotherforum, I know some reunions that have worked out amazingly well.

    Camping with his dad didn't seem that much of a stretch. When my daughter first came to NY to visit, we spent three days exploring Manhattan from the top of the Statue of Liberty to the Circle Line to a funky Village restaurant.

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  3. Lorraine - So glad you posted this here about last night's episode "The Born Identity." In Plain Sight is one of my all-time favorite TV shows. Love it, love it, love it!!!

    However, when the show took a turn towards adoption last night (especially when Mary went off about what they would find if they looked for his mother), I told my husband, "I think I am going to have to turn this off tonight."

    But then Marshall Mann said what he did about the primal wound and I went, "I think they get it, honey. The writers know about the primal wound. I think they just might get it."

    And they did.

    I started crying during the scene where the dad learns that Walter (the character in WITSEC) is his son. My big, bad, Green Beret/Special Ops soldier husband put his arms around me and with tears in his own eyes said, "I am so sorry Gorgeous. I hope she doesn't wait to long to come find you." He was pretty upset that Walter might have to leave his new-found family again to go into the witness protection program and kept saying, "There has to be a way that they can keep him and his dad together! There has to be a way!!!"

    As tidy of an ending as it was, I was thrilled to see the writers really did have it figured out. I don't know if I could have handled having one of my favorite TV characters (Mary) turn out to be such a dolt in this area and it was refreshing to see her attitudes change as the episode progressed.

    M.

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  4. I've seen this show before and it is really good. USA has alot of great shows (and a few that aren't so great). Monk (my favorite show) used to air on this station and interestingly, the finale was about Adoption. Sort of. Trudy (Monk's late wife whose death by a car bomb caused him to develop severe OCD) had a baby in college and was told that her baby died, which was a lie. She was then put up for Closed Adoption To make a two hour episode short, at the end Monk finds out about Trudy's off spring and having a "part of" Trudy there with him again, begins to heal him. In this series, Monk hated to be touched and touch other people, but he gives Trudy's daughter a big bear hug as soon as he meets her, He had no problem seeing her as Trudy's child.....I wasn't sure what Google Babies is so I ah, googled it, LoL and you should see the review for it Lorraine-they should of called it FrankenBabies instead...
    "Sex between a man and a woman is not anymore the only way to make a baby. This is a scary documentary showing how adults ignore a children's right to know their mother and father. The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child states that all children have a right to know their parents.
    Wealthy persons in the West can now buy an egg from an egg donor in the United States or another Western country, get sperm from another donor or himself and implant the embryo into a surrogate mother in India. These people don't want their Caucasian genes to be mixed with a poor woman from India, but as surrogate mothers they are good enough....
    One of the most scary examples in the film was a 57-year-old divorcée and childless woman who wanted a baby. Of course she was too old to have her own eggs, and too old to have a uterus for her own baby. She did not have a man either, but that was no problem for Doron, the manager of the child production company in Israel. Doron is able to provide a sperm donor, egg donor and a surrogate mother, and the baby is produced and delivered in a timely manner to the customer without a complicated pregnancy.
    It is a human right for children to know their parents, but it is not a human right for adults to buy a baby"

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