Friday, March 25, 2011

Madonna's Malawi charity fails and Ethiopian adoptions shut down to a trickle: Could there be abuse in the system?

Madonna in 2007, photo by Karel Prinsloo  AP

5 comments :

  1. I read about this yesterday on Bastardette. Madonna bought the little girl she adopted who isn't an orphan.
    Her promises are empty as she is with all the money
    she reportedly raised you would think she could hire
    professionals to make sure her purchase actually
    helped some truly needy kids.

    How many kids could have been helped and fed. What
    pitiful waste looks like she is going to earn more money
    seems like she's at making and wasting and taking.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This story sickens me. 3.8 million dollars. How many Malawi children would that have enabled to live with their REAL parents and be raised to adulthood? I remember when Madonna's petition to adopt Mercy was denied. But, of course, what Madonna wants Madonna gets.

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  3. I find it terribly sad that there is not more press about this idiocy. The facts are simple, almost every third-world nation where American's adopt has a huge amount of corruption. The adopters should, at this point in time, be completely aware of the abuses in the system... So it makes you wonder at the ignorance of the individuals or maybe just the greed.

    As for Madonna, I didn't like her music and I don't like her lifestyle or the things she does to bring herself back into the limelight... she is pathetic.

    ReplyDelete
  4. $3.8 million dollars divided by the annual income in Malawi ($160/per YEAR) = 23,750 YEARS worth of annual income in Malawi.

    Divide the 23,750 years of average income by 18 years (how long it would take raise a child) = 1319.

    With the money Madonna's crew wasted, she could have helped 1319 families stay together.

    ONE THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED AND NINETEEN families.

    Instead, they got one brick.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Regardless of what I think about Madonna, Oprah, Angelina and other professed do-gooders personally, I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt that they want to improve conditions for children in whatever African country they happen to land in.

    I spent time in East Africa and know that it’s very difficult to look in any direction and not be compelled to act immediately to help. Girls, boys and women particularly who face rape each day. There are mechanisms in place in most African countries, the ones not at war with themselves, for education. Many developed and supported by UNICEF, the Peace Corps and well established NGOs.

    What’s missing in the popular media and whenever these very visible individual do-gooders make the press is that without support in the form of clean water, feminine hygiene products for school-age girls, malaria nets and personal safety for school-aged girls and boys, it’s almost impossible for children to complete education beyond a certain age perpetuating the poverty, illiteracy and violence that the do-gooders are trying to erase. And it’s these very things that compromise families. It’s easy for people willing to pay for children so sure they’re able to make a better life for the child. They’re willing to pay for children rather than do their research to identify NGOs and other organizations working from the ground up to change things, for the better, for African children and families within their own countries.

    For the life of me I can’t see how one intercountry adoption raises the lot of the millions left behind.

    ReplyDelete

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